A Day of Days

The Annunciation and Good Friday come together today: hope and fear, faith and betrayal, good news and a judge’s verdict, “Guilty!” Historically the days belong together and unhardened hearts are right to agree it’s a day of days. It is a good time for Jesus’ return, in my opinion, adding, “It is made new” to His “It is finished.”

 

Admittedly, there are a few more baptisms I hope happen, more converts, more confessions and reception of love and forgiveness to pray for.

When so many pastors have been writing extra sermons and praying for visitors, infrequent members and others, my dear one has had to write a funeral sermon. Life and death after hopes and fears, death awaiting resurrection.

One day can contain so much. One day can change almost anything. It’s terrifying and humbling and absolutely real.

The Easter Triduum, or the Three Days, is the period from Maundy Thursday evening through Good Friday evening (day 1), through Holy Saturday (day 2), through Easter Sunday (day 3). Three days of the will and testament of Jesus and then an inheritance He will share with all the faithful.

A time to inspire words and art in every form while also a time to . . .

Let all mortal flesh keep silence
And with fear and trembling stand;
Ponder nothing earthly minded,
For with blessing in his hand
Christ our God to earth descending
Comes our homage to demand.

King of kings yet born of Mary,
As of old on earth he stood,
Lord of lords in human vesture,
In the body and the blood,
He will give to all the faithful
His own self for heavenly food.

Rank on rank the host of heaven
Spreads it vanguard on the way
As the Light of Light, descending
From the realms of endless day,
Comes the powers of hell to vanquish
As the darkness clears away.

At his feet the six winged seraph,
Cherubim with sleepless eye,
Veil their faces to the presence
As with ceaseless voice they cry . . . .

From the Liturgy of St. James (Lutheran Service Book #621)

Our praise is still to come.

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